Earning

6 side hustles you could try even if you only have 30 minutes a day

One actor on Fiverr charges $10 for a 1-minute Marilyn Monroe impersonation.

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Many people who want to start a side hustle, but haven't, say worries about the time and energy commitment are holding them back. One in 5 men and 17% of women say they're worried a side hustle would take away time from their kids and family, according to an October 2020 survey of 2,000 U.S. adults from savings and investing app Acorns.

If you're among those who are keen to start a side hustle but feel like you never have enough time, fear not. There are plenty of side hustles you can do on a 30-minutes break from work or even, in some cases, during a 10-minute window between errands. And altogether, at the end of the month, your earnings can still add up.

Here are six side hustles that don't have to take up much of your time.

Tutor English online

Kids all over the world are taught English in school, which means there are lots of parents who want to give their kids a leg up. Sites like VIPKid, GoGoKid, and Magic Ears pair Chinese students with English tutors for 25-minute classes online.

Tutors pick time slots that work with their schedule, and all three companies provide lesson plans. GoGoKid and VIPKid lessons are taught one-on-one while Magic Ears tutors teach four students at a time.

GoGoKid teachers typically make $7-$10 per class and VIPKid tutors make $7-$9 per class, according to their websites. Magic Ears tutors make $9-$11 per class, according to SideHusl.

If you put in more hours, and especially if you build a relationship with these companies and they start giving you responsibilities like training other tutors, your efforts can really pay off. English tutor Brett Stevens makes $3,000 per month from her work on these kinds of sites.

Test websites

Before companies release new websites and mobile apps, UserTesting pays people to try them out and look for bugs. Users take 20- to 30-minute tests that pay at least $10 each. Users create profiles with their information (age, location, etc.) and can then take the tests their demographics are a match for.

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Sell a skill on Fiverr

If you have a quirky, quick-to-execute skill — say, you can do a spot-on celebrity impersonation, write in classic graffiti lettering, or teach people how to make a family of origami ducks in 10 minutes or less — consider posting your skill on Fiverr for the masses who are willing to pay.

One actor on Fiverr charges $10 for a 1-minute Marilyn Monroe impersonation.

Review products

If you have a lot of opinions, reviewing products before they go to market may be your side hustle of choice. Market research sites like ProductTube ask users to review products by making short videos about them in exchange for Amazon gift cards of $5 to $35, according to SideHusl.

Note that some assignments may ask you to go to stores physically. Given the coronavirus pandemic, make sure to only take on the assignments you feel comfortable with.  

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Be an influencer

If you have a social media following of at least a few hundred followers, you may be able to bank on it through apps like Heartbeat, which connects "ambassadors," as it calls them, with brands that may want to hire them to post about their products.

Those selected to participate in a campaign create posts about the product for Instagram or TikTok, with expected pay ranging from $3-$50 per post, according to SideHusl.

Answer questions

If you have an expertise in anything from law to plumbing to IT, you may be able to make some money off that knowledge on websites such as JustAnswer. JustAnswer pairs people with a question about a given topic with experts in the field, paying experts $18-$50 per answer. How long it takes to answer a question can vary, but some could take just a few minutes.

Experts must apply on the site, which has an acceptance rate of between 10% and 12% of all applicants.

The more hours you put in, the more your work can pay off. RV repairman Randall Gibbons made $20,000 per month answering questions on the site for several months in 2020.

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