Earning

3 side hustles for night owls: One can pay as much as $40/hour

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Key Points
  • Nearly a quarter, 24%, of people say they’re most alert at night, according to a 2020 survey published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.
  • If you identify as a night owl and are looking for a side hustle, consider working in customer service, dog walking, or late-night blogging.

Some people wake up early to go running before work. Others stay up late playing video games with friends abroad. People's internal clocks vary, but many self-identify as night owls. Nearly a quarter, 24%, of people say they're most alert at night, according to a 2020 survey published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

If you happen to be most awake at night and are looking for a way to earn some extra cash, there are income streams you can build in those late evening hours. Wherever your interests lie, "these are side hustles that you can fit into the time that you've got," says Kathy Kristof, founder and editor of Sidehusl.com.

Here are three side hustles for night owls.

Customer service representative

Customer service representative roles are among those that have seen the most growth in remote opportunities in the last few years. In fact, they are currently among the most in-demand remote jobs, according to job search site FlexJobs.

Some customer service jobs have opportunities "24/7," says Kristof. "So if you wanted to work from midnight till four in the morning, you sign up for these customer service jobs with companies like Working Solutions or Liveops."

Kristof warns that one challenge with these gigs is "they mostly pay you by the minute, and a lot of them pay you by the engagement." That means, even if you're technically at your desk waiting to receive calls, you're not getting paid. Some companies even make you pay for your own training, she says. So make sure you read the contracts before signing up.

Customer service representatives make an average of nearly $15 per hour, according to Indeed. Find open gigs on either of the aforementioned sites or job search sites like Indeed, ZipRecruiter, LinkedIn, or FlexJobs.

Dog walker

If you happen to love furry creatures, some pups in your neighborhood may need late-night attention.

"Sometimes people need their dog walked at like 10 o'clock because they're not coming home" till later, says side hustle expert Kevin Ha. He has seen requests for dog walking as late as 11 p.m. on sites like Wag!

Offer your dog walking services on sites like Wag!, Rover, or Care.com. Rates vary depending on region, length of the walk, and the number of pups you're walking, but are between $20 and $40 per hour on average, according to Thumbtack.

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Blogger

If you have a creative flair and are not necessarily in a hurry to see your side hustle pay cash immediately, you might also consider blogging.

Bloggers make money in several ways, through ads on their sites, for example, or through affiliate links. The latter are plugs for products relevant to that blogger's beat using specific links. If readers make a purchase using these links, bloggers can get a commission, which is a great way to make some passive income.

When Ha himself started his blog, Financial Panther, about his various side hustles, he was working full time as a lawyer. "I would work on the blog at night, eight o'clock, nine o'clock … basically till midnight or one o'clock," he says. The blog now brings in enough that Ha quit his job as a lawyer to work on it full time.

Blogger Rocky Trifari, who writes about travel, brings in $100-$2,500 per month in passive income from his site, and Nick Loper, whose blog is also about side hustles, brings in $10,000-$15,000 per month in affiliate marketing revenue.

Because it can take so long to build the hustle out as an income stream, "you've got to really like blogging," Ha says, and be patient. Even in the years when the blog was not really making much, "that's what kept me going," he says.

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